Project News, Summer 2019

It’s been quite a while since I posted anything here. There are several reasons for that, but the main one is because 2019 has been a year of photography, and I post about that over at chrisroutledge.pictures. Since deciding to concentrate more of my time on visual art late in 2018, around the time of Carousel, I’ve had several projects on the go.

Liverpool Art Fair, 2019

Firstly, I have work at the Liverpool Art Fair, which is being held this year at Liverpool’s Metquarter shopping mall, a space with remarkably good light for looking at pictures. The five pieces I have on show are all Liverpool based, and four of them come from my ongoing “Reflections on Liverpool” series. The fifth is the popular “Futurist” print shown here. I was interviewed recently for a short Q&A on the perennial subject of ‘photography as art’ over at the Liverpool Art Fair website.

There is a huge variety of interesting work on show at the art fair, all of which is for sale, and I highly recommend having a wander over to the Metquarter if you have some time to spare in Liverpool this summer (the show closes on September 1st).

Indeterminate Land. Heaton Cooper Studio Archive Gallery, Grasmere, October 9th-November 3rd.

My main project for the autumn is “Indeterminate Land,” a solo exhibition and book exploring our relationship with the landscape of the Lake District through the aftermath of ‘Storm Desmond’, a violent and destructive storm that struck Northern England and Southern Scotland in December 2015. I began photographing a short section of the river Rothay, near the village of Rydal during the storm, and in the months that followed, and the exhibition will include around 30 pieces of work looking at changes made to the landscape by the storm, and severe flooding. Working with various approaches to image making, including pinhole photography, I have also tried to explore the feelings of shock, and to some extent trauma, that followed from the storm, and to think about how the much mythologised landscape of the Romantic poets and painters manages to defy myth making. More information about Indeterminate Land is here. A signed and numbered limited edition book based on the project is now available to pre-order.

Indeterminate Land runs from 9th October to 3rd September 2019 at the Heaton Cooper Studio Archive Gallery, Grasmere.

The Arctic Whaling Year Exhibition

VW02Shetlandmenlite-300x238A quick plug for The Arctic Whaling Year, an exhibition of the work of my friend Caroline Hack, an artist who works with textiles to create images and objects relating to whales and whaling from historic Arctic whaling, mostly from around the turn of the nineteenth century. Caroline spends a lot of her time in archives and museums gathering information and recording objects that go into her work in the form of printed or stitched textiles. The result is a series of beautiful pieces including “Calling at Shetland” (above). I particularly like the way the brutality of whaling is juxtaposed with the vibrant colours and soft textures of the print and fabrics.

The exhibition is at Verdant Works, Dundee until January 3rd, 2019. More information is at Caroline’s website, and at Verdant Works.

 

Northern Exposure 2015

View from the Ribblehead Viaduct, North Yorkshire.
Framed: view from the Ribblehead Viaduct, North Yorkshire.

Last week I had some exciting news. I have been selected to exhibit my photography in the Northern Exposure exhibition at the Portico Library and Gallery in Manchester. Northern Exposure is an annual exhibition of the work of seven or eight artists from the North of England. This year the exhibition is taking place from 3-30 July, during the Manchester International Festival, so it is a great opportunity for me as a photographer, and one I know I am lucky to have been offered.

For as long as I can remember I have been interested in where the boundaries lie between rural and urban, natural and human-made. Even in my relatively short lifetime British culture has become significantly more urban-centred (and London-centric), but of course the process goes back much further than that. I have begun choosing the eight or so pictures for hanging in the exhibition and all of them will explore the ways in which human activity and nature interact, the human influence on apparently natural landscapes, and how we have come to see the natural, or perhaps unnatural, world.

More of my work is over at my photography website Mottershead and Hayes.